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talking about every morning here since the election. fiscal cliff, big, big issue. there are now, it seems, growing numbers of people on both the right and the left who would like to see us just go over that fiscal cliff. how big of a problem would that be? >> that would be a big problem. i actually still believe that those -- the democrats, the administration, republicans in the final analysis don't want to see that happen. they do understand that not only would that present a problem in the near term as we went over the cliff at the end of the year, but we still then have the whole debt ceiling fight that would transpire shortly into the new year. the issue isn't simply the negative result of going over the cliff, but it's also that business, consumers, everybody continues to hold back on the uncertainty. and we believe the economy is pretty well positioned potentially in 2013 if we can put this behind us. so i think a lot of what's going on is what you would expect to see in this negotiation, very public negotiation, which is not the best way to do it. i think at some point, the preside
, president obama and house speaker boehner spending a sunday together to talk about the fiscal cliff. no word on any progress and the president will be in detroit today to speak about the economy. joining us right now is cnbc's chief washington correspondent john harwood. john, you had a great column over the weekend in the in, times whether you took a look back at what happened in 1990 where things were set up for a grit debate but maybe things were easier at that point because you didn't have the 24-hour news cycle. you had other things that made it easier the last time around. what does that lead us to think this time around? >> well, there are ways in which it was more difficult, as you just alluded to, becky. but there are a lot of similarities, too. there are warnings that the economy is going to take a huge hit if a multi year budget deal was not enacted. you had a republican party led by a president who had made a no tax pledge and who was trying to figure out a way out of that. when he finally did that, that's when the negotiations took on a faster pace. and i do think here the fact
't supposed to -- i see. >> okay. >> i got it. >>> mike duke did mention the fiscal cliff. we're going to talk about it now. death and taxes among the things we're talking about. will a higher dividend tax rate essentially kill taxpayers at every income level? joining us to talk about this and more on the fiscal cliff is thomas fanning, chairman, president, and ceo of electric giant southern company. how does a utility, tom, how do you prepare for the uncertainty surrounding the fiscal cliff and these washington issues? i guess it's -- you know, in the back of your mind, but you got to run a business, don't you? >> sure. look, we plan with uncertasrcer all the time. our whoerizeons are 30, 40 years. there are big time economic horizons going on. one of the thing we're a indicator of is the future health of the economy. what we have seen is first quarter this year was a really good quarter. second quarter was okay. third quarter went to a dead stop in terms of economic growth. at least in the southeast. we have over 300 projects sitting on the shelf representing about 45,000 jobs. $15 billion o
the fiscal cliff and caterpillar's ceo joins us from the nyse to talk about the fix the debt campaign and more. you know anything we don't know, doug, that you can tell us about how this finally looks and whether we do it? >> i don't know if i know any more than you do or not, joe, but we've all been working hard to impress upon our leadership in washington how important this is not to go over the cliff. we had good sessions with republican leadership, democratic leaderships and with president obama in the white house. nobody over there wants to go over the cliff at this time, there's nothing that wants to do it. >> once we get over it, we hope it's a bridge to something that will help you and caterpillar compete better in the world. after the cliff, what do you want? is there any emphasis on corporate tax reform that we need or how to bring $2 trillion back to this country? aren't those things, did you talk about any of those or the cliff? >> we talked about all of those, long-term competitiveness for our country, immigration reform that needs to happen, and there's a lot of bipartis
on in town. in washington news, both parties hinting at renewed talks on the fiscal cliff. the acknowledgement of open lines of communication passed for encouraging news. a new survey finds more than 60% of leading investment professionals predict a shorp stock decline in the market if the government fails to come up with a deal. in this case defined as a more than 10% drop in the dow. 56% surveyed foresee a deal to avoid the cliff by year end, 44% predict failure in the ongoing negotiations. as for corporate america, through yesterday's close, there have been # 70 announcements of special dividends. these special difference deebds are valueded a more than $30.1 billion. among the latest names, mcgraw hill will pay a special dividends of $2.50 a share before year end. and drop its previously announced plan to buy back up to $200 million more of stock this year. >> everybody's paid their dividends this year, so they won't be paying them next year. >> this is a major issue. what's going to happen is -- we have two great economists onset. but that money will get annualized, s
boehner's office to reach a deal on the fiscal cliff. while talks continue privately between both, no public details of progression toward the compromise have been released. in the last hour, our guest, tony fratto who is the former press secretary and jerry bernstein agreed that we would likely get some sort of a deal, just perhaps not in a form that was widely expected. joining us right now is the first of many lawmakers we'll be speaking with today, texas congressman jeb hensarling who is also the incoming chairman of the house financial services committee. and mr. chairman, first of all, congratulations. >> thank you. good morning. >> good morning. thanks for being with us today. >> happy to do it. >> we hear all of this talk, we hear all the talk that's been leading up to this point. we know it's gone a little quieter at this point. maybe that's a good thing. i also know you've been pretty firm about this. you've said that elections do have consequences. the president is getting his revenues. now he's drawing a line in the sand when it comes to tax rates. do you agree to go a
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6